I find it interesting that the patient track at breast cancer medical conferences always seems to start before the conference. So it was yesterday, when Novartis kicked-off the patient conversation. I am guessing about 60 of us, patients and advocates, representing 20 or more countries, met to learn more about living with metastatic breast cancer, and to talk about the challenges.

Novartis supported the international Count Us, Know Us, Join Us study (n=1273). It was fitting to share the results, such as they were, at the Advanced Breast Cancer Second International Consensus Conference, since in some way the need to count us was on the table two years ago when the conference launched.

This online, global study sought to explore the unmet needs and attitudes of metastatic (or advanced or secondary or Stage IV breast cancer patients) in an effort to identify gaps in information and support:

40% of MBC patients feel isolated.
77% are out there trying to find information.
55% feel that the information they find doesn’t meet their needs.
45% feel finding the right information is difficult.

In terms of support, 80% get what they need (I speculate that they are confusing need and expect, but who am I to judge?) from their oncologist, but most find that support from friends and family wanes over time.

No surprises for those of us living with the disease, and there was lots more. Each geographic region gave a localized report about this or other surveys that have been conducted. You can find results on the Count Us, Know Us, Join Us website.

While is seems that everyone is interested in us, remarkably, they actually haven’t counted us. Seriously. We don’t have global, or even local numbers and we don’t have registries (except in Switzerland) that track mets-specific diagnoses. And as MBCN President Shirley Mertz put so well,

“If you don’t count it, it doesn’t matter to you.”

Any wonder some of us feel isolated? Lots of work to be done here!!

After a series of briefings about the “on the ground” experiences and “best practices” from across the globe, we meet in regional teams to begin the work of tackling the challenges we each face. It was a wonderful opportunity to connect with other patients and advocates and be infused with new ideas. There is no question the task is great, nor that each region faces its distinct challenges, but there is more overlap than not. Here is the summary I presented on behalf of the US/Canada team:

What We Need

  • Influence legislators to ensure research funding
  • Increase percent of research dollars allocated to MBC-specific studies
  • Change approach of health care professionals to be more “realistic”
  • Insure patient access to information and support
  • Organizational collaboration
  • Breast Cancer on a spectrum (previvor – metastatic)

How We Get There

  • Global Day of Action
  • Continued Advocacy
  • Adapt registries to account for (subsequent) mets diagnoses
  • Pink ribbon needs to be longer, gradations of pink

All in all a very productive 1/2 day, but as usually I find the follow-up steps lacking. What we do with our ideas, how they become actionable, where the support might come from? We don’t ever seem to get to that part of the conversation. :-(.

In all the thinking I’ve done about advocacy in general, I find this to be a core challenge. It’s one thing to bring information and contacts back to your organization for future reference, but perhaps because I don’t have a single “home” organization, perhaps because I haven’t started my own non-profit to cover my one little corner of identified needs, I don’t think this is enough. I wonder what happens in the big picture and I worry about how many brilliant ideas get lost when we return home and the luster begins to fade…

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Linda Grier
    Nov 08, 2013 @ 12:52:11

    Thanks so much for your advocacy work, at this conference and beyond, and for sharing it with us. As a BRCA+ woman who hasn’t yet had cancer, I appreciate the idea of a spectrum of breast cancer that includes previvors as well as those with metastatic disease.

    Reply

    • Lori
      Nov 08, 2013 @ 13:19:37

      I couldn’t agree more, Linda! I think it was Franklin who said that we must hang together, or surely we shall hang alone. We ARE a spectrum and must both support and learn from one another.

      Reply

  2. Catherine
    Nov 08, 2013 @ 14:25:57

    Hmm, the access to information could benefit everyone at all stages. It can be so difficult to get one’s own into, and that is crazy – it is OUR information.

    Reply

    • Lori
      Nov 08, 2013 @ 14:28:41

      Funny you should say that. In one meeting I urged that all patients should get their info in writing, and I got push-back since not everyone wants the info and not everyone can read. Global conference – I get that! But is there HARM in giving someone their information?? They can read it at their own pace, have a friend read it… More on that to come.

      Reply

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